Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

If you eat at Rubio’s today you can help Trinity…

08.19.10

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This is a plea to family and friends in the east valley in Phoenix! :)

Trinity got accepted onto her dance studio’s company team this year! Rubio’s Mexican Grill is going to donate 20% of your meal cost toward Trinity’s dance expenses if you go with her name and flyer today. The donated funds will go into an account for Trinity to help pay for costumes, travel, class fees, etc.

Wanna help out by eating lunch or dinner there today? You need to know two important things:

* Please print and take this flyer and put “Trinity Hyman” on it. She won’t get credit without the flyer and her name.

* Please go to one of these three locations:

Mesa – US 60 & Signal Butte Rd
1804 S. Signal Butte Road, Mesa, AZ 85209

Mesa – Baseline & Power
6736 E. Baseline Road, Mesa, AZ 85206

Gilbert – Power & Ray
4770 E. Ray Road Ste. 106, Gilbert, AZ 85296

They have take-out too!

Thanks so much for your help and support!

Hugs,
Noell + Izzy + Trinity

Giveaway: 9 Most Influential Scrapbookers 2010

07.20.10


I snuck my way into the scrapbooking industry.

Traditionally, scrapbookers have had to hope for a spot on a prestigious design team, or get noticed by a magazine to get a place in our competitive little world. I didn’t do that. Izzy wanted to produce a scrapbooking video tutorial. I was a scrapbooker and I have performance experience. So we combined our skills and created the Paperclipping Video Tutorials.

People started watching, and then people started purchasing memberships. It was really an amazing experience.

Full of ideas, we have since turned Paperclipping into a multi-show and event website: I started the first live scrapbooking show over the internet a few years back, and we now have two audio talk shows where we gather together interesting people with interesting things to say about our hobby — again, unlike anything we’ve ever seen in scrapbooking. It’s been fun!

We’ve just been here having a great time while expending a lot of sweat and love in order to provide the ultimate experience for scrapbookers. So it made me happy and grateful to be noticed when I got the letter from Ella Publishing, announcing they nominated me as one of the Nine Most Influential Scrapbookers for 2010.

Thanks for noticing me, Ella! :)

Each of us nine nominees contributed to this book, which you can purchase for only $4.99…

Or you might try and win the book, along with 9 other prizes. . .

Giveaway

I get to give away a prize from each of us nominees, plus the book from Ella. . .

  • A $20 gift certificate from Ella Publishing Co.
  • Two digital-scrapbooking template packs (20 templates) from Cathy Zielske
  • A six-month Paperclipping membership from Noell Hyman
  • A “Play Date” product pack from Jenni Bowlin
  • A place in either a beginner photo-editing class or a beginner digital-scrapbooking class from
    Jessica Sprague
  • A spot in the “Beginner/Intermediate Online Photography Workshop” from Maggie Holmes
  • “Paper Girl” and “On Holiday” product packs from Margie Romney-Aslett
  • A $50 gift certificate toward any class on reneepearson.com from Renee Pearson
  • A place for you and a friend in both “Love Your Pictures, Love Your Pages” and “Journal Your
    Christmas” from Shimelle Laine
  • A place in either Elizabeth Dillow’s “Inspiration Defined” or Karen Grunberg’s “Book of Stories”
    from Stacy Julian

How to Enter

I will pick randomly, but you have to answer a question! Here’s the question:

When you were little, were you attached to a baby blanket? A thumb? A stuffed toy? What were you attached to? Or were you so independent you didn’t need anything? Please share.

Tomorrow I will share my own story of emotional childhood attachment. You have until tonight to enter the drawing with your comment. Ten people will win!

ETA: Thank you! This contest is now closed! I have emailed the winners, but in case you’re interested, here the random numbers and the names of the winners:

82-Pat Hines * 526-Lizzie * 583-Heather C * 311-Kate Blue * 804-Nitasha * 740-Britta * 278-Nancy * 689-Sylvie H * 172-Liz Freeze * 146-Jennifer Alfonso

Congratulations!

Why Nobody Died When We Got Rid Of TV.

06.28.10

kids_in_hallway
I mentioned recently that we don’t have TV. Readers reacted. It was cute.

Our decision to remove television from our daily lives was not entirely for the reasons you might think. Also, our kids are actually allowed to watch it a little from the internet. But they rarely choose to. So here’s how that phenomenon came about and why…

The Reasons: A Combo of Old-Fashioned Values, Creativity Values, & Futurist-Techie Geekiness

Old Fashioned Values: It’s probably obvious from my blog that I only embody some old-fashioned values while many others I shun. I’m quite strict and traditional when it comes to what I think is appropriate content for children — more strict even than many of the religious families I know. There are a lot of “children” shows that are surprisingly not really child-friendly.

Restricting content is the easy part, though. You just tell the kids why they can’t watch a certain show and then empathize with their wishes that TV producers wouldn’t deliver that kind of content to children. Kids understand honest reasoning, and they respond well to your empathy toward their unfulfilled wishes.

Creativity Values: It’s the general limiting of time on the television that I found difficult. For years we let our kids watch TV, more than I ever thought I would as a parent. I am an avid non-watcher. I always thought I’d be good at limiting the amount they watched. It turns out that if you’re also distracted with an exciting lot of projects you enjoy, it’s hard to monitor amounts. And when a child sinks into the TV habit, it’s hard for him or her to motivate themselves to do creative stuff.

Plus, all day, everyday, our kids were constant infomercials to Izzy and me, pitching sales lines like, “At Best Western, if you drop a towel, they’ll pick it up for you!”

We supposedly needed this mattress, and that kitchen device, and a million different other things. The kids were adding items to their own Christmas list every single day starting Dec. 26 of each new year.

Futurist Techie Geekiness:
Then something amazing happened. Television shows began to appear on the internet! Izzy loves diving into the future headfirst before anyone else has gotten there, and as soon as a handful of shows became available online he sat the family down and made a proposition. He told the kids that we would let them each buy a TV show episode from Netflix every week in place of the TV. They could also watch some shows online.

The kids agreed. We canceled the satellite. For probably four years now, absolutely zero shows feed though the big black box in our living room. It only works for gaming and DVD’s now. We don’t even have local channels.

Then The Magic Happenend

Something truly magical and amazing happened two or three weeks after we got rid of TV — the kids lost interest! They stopped requesting the weekly show we promised to purchase for them. Since that time, internet television has grown and shows are easier to access than ever (and are usually free) but our kids only sit down to watch them around once a month or so. It’s amazing.
dinner_outside
A few weeks ago we were having dinner and one of the kids piped up, “It’s so weird how a bunch of my friends will start talking about some toy that they all know about but I’ve never heard of it. It’s because they learn about all this stuff on commercials.”

The other of our older two children agreed to noticing the same thing.

Uh-oh. Here it comes, I thought. They’re going to tell us that it bugs them how weird and different we are from everybody else.

“So, how do you feel about that?” I asked.

“It’s okay,” one said.

“Yeah, I don’t care,” said the other. “It’s just weird that they all know about the same things.”

Wow. I was not expecting them to be cool with that. I mean, I personally have never minded being different all my life. But I don’t know many other people who are cool with it.

So we talked about how much time they have to be creative and make things — which they do daily — and they said it’s a good trade.

We may be secularist, vegan, non-materialist, non-TV weirdo’s, but we’re a bit Leave It To Beaver, too.